Workshop Descriptions

TheI-GazeInterweave for Attachment Repair in EMDR Therapy


The I-Gaze interweave offers an intimate, intersubjective dyadic resource to facilitate resolution of attachment trauma. The four part training begins with the Domains of Self model: a heuristic for rapidassessment to differentiateattachment trauma from relational or shock traumas. The second partdescribes the zone of optimal arousal--a model thatguides the therapist to assessing stability in Phase 4 (of the EMDR protocol) and remedy hyper-arousal. The third part describes somatic interweaves that are instrumental in regulating autonomic arousal. The workshop concludes with the I-Gaze interweave in its theoretical and practicalaspects. Used in conjunction with the standard EMDR protocol, this interweave can facilitate attachment repair,interweave specific transference and countertransference phenomenon will be examined for theirdiagnostic andprognostic value.

TheI-Gaze Interweavefor Attachment Repair in EMDR
Therapy 6-hour Webinar

The Marriage of EMDR and Ego State Theory in Couples Therapy


Our most challenging couples often present with poor interpersonal boundaries, mutual and sometimes hostile dependency, and reliance on blame and projection. One or both partners may experience ego state conflict. Ego state conflict can dominate relational patterns even in clients without a trauma history.

By augmenting EMDR with the explanatory power and clinical inventiveness of ego state theory, couples therapy can be brought to new levels of efficacy.

On day one, participants will learn about the relational nature of the Self and the challenges of differentiation, intergenerational family dynamics that contribute to ego fragmentation, and manifestations of ego state conflict (tertiary dissociation) in couples therapy.

On day two, participants will learn to assess the interlocking of negative cognitions of client couples and implement strategies to contract for individually focused EMDR, the risks and benefits of conjoint EMDR, as well as learn a model of EMDR treatment planning that describes target selection and salience.

Finally, participants will learn a progression of techniques to control and focus desensitization within the optimal zone of arousal.

This is a two-day, 14 credit-hour workshop eligible for EMDRIA credits.



The Embodied Self in EMDR Therapy


Trauma not only effects cognitive experience, but also somatosensor experience. Theembodied self state--stemming from the traumatic node--may be frozen, fighting, fleeing, or numb.

Participants will learn how to integate theory and methods from Somatic Experiencing and Sensorimotor Psychotherapy into EMDR therapy to facilitate safe, effective, and thorough processing.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to describe the animal defenses mediated by the autonomic nervous system.
  2. Participants will be able to describe the theory of non-completed defensive psychomotor actions and the consequences for trauma.

  3. Participants will be able to identify criteria for the use of somatic interweaves during phase four of EMDR therapy.

  4. Participants will learn to facilitate the completion of defensive motor actions during phase four of EMDR therapy.



Beyond Trauma Resolution:
EMDR and the Growth of the Relational Self


We need each other.This basic truth goes beyond our biological imperative and speaks to the very nature of being human. As our personalities are shaped by our early family experience, we continue to perceive and interact with the world in ways that were adaptive to our original context. Such loyalty to our families is often invisible, and yet is a powerful source of motivation that can either promote, or prohibit growth and healing.

Therapists who are unaware of the dimensions of the loyalty system can inadvertently place their clients in impossible binds, leading to impasses, stagnation, and treatment failure. By learning to assess and observe the rules of the loyalty system in which each client is embedded, therapists can better surface unconscious motivation and mobilize resources for change.

In Part One, participants will learn about the relationship between family dynamics and ego structure, reenactments from the family of origin, and the manifestations of ego state conflict in individual and conjoint therapy.

In Part Two, participants will learn a model for EMDR-based assessment and treatment planning using contextual family therapy, the indications and contraindications of conjoint EMDR, a model of the Self that zeroes in on the salient negative cognitions being triggered, and learn a progression of techniques to control and focus desensitization within the optimal zone of arousal.

This interactive workshop will include videotape and didactic material designed to facilitate a deeper understanding of this exciting new integrative model.For individual, couples, and family therapists.

This is a two-day, 14 credit-hour workshop eligible for EMDRIA credits.



The Interior Life of the Family:

Integrating EMDR and Contextual Family Therapy

Families that come to therapy often present with multiple issues and co-morbidities, from individual symptoms to interpersonal dysfunction. Clients seen individually are often members of such families, and the option to convene relatives offers a rich opportunity to both expand the circle of care and to liberate individuals from a web of pathological interactions. Combining EMDR with family therapy offers a new and innovative pathway to transforming both psyche and system.

This advanced workshop is at once intellectually stimulating and extremely practical. Barry will demonstrate a seamless integration of EMDR and system work based on Boszormenyi-Nagy's contextual therapy. In day one participants will learn about the relationship between family dynamics and ego structure, reenactments in client couples and families, and the intergenerational transmission of psychopathology.

In day two, participants will learn a model for EMDR-based assessment and treatment planning using contextual family therapy, understand the indications and contraindications of conjoint EMDR sessions, and learn how to structure a multi-person therapy that incorporates EMDR.

In addition, participants will learn a progression of techniques to control and focus desensitization within the optimal zone of arousal. This interactive workshop will include practicum, videotape and didactic material designed to facilitate a deeper understanding of this exciting new integrative model.

This is a two-day, 14 credit workshop approved for EMDRIA credits.



Keeping it in the Zone:
Assessment and Techniques for Optimal Processing

This workshops describes the clinical conditions in which phase four processing is most effective:the zone of optimal arousal.The zone is the intersection of two dynamic client variables: dual attention and autonomic arousal. The training begins with a heuristic for rapid assessment of negative cognitions and self experience­-the domains of Self­­.This assessment assists the therapist in predicting the challenges of phase 4, and lends guidance for successful resolution. Part two deconstructs the zone of optimal arousal into a typology that allows the therapist to assess if, when, and what interventions are needed in phase four to keep processing on track. Some of the interventions described aresomatic interweaves,that will be described in part three.

This is a three-hour workshop eligible for 2.5 EMDRIA credits.




Advanced Techniques in the Use of EMDR to Treat Complex Trauma

This workshop introduces two conceptual frameworks: Theoptimal zone of arousalandnode isolation theory and techniques.The first is for assessing readiness for, and identifying obstacles to, safe phase four reprocessing. The second describes a progression of steps for isolating the node at the epicenter of the trauma memory.

This is a 1.5 credit-hour workshop eligible for EMDRIA credits.



Node Isolation Theory*

and the Eye-Zone Differential Technique*

Barry's Node IsolationStrategies,including his ownEye-Zone Differential Technique,promote precise elicitation of the traumatic node with multiple titration and resourcing options for safe and efficient processing of highly disturbing material. These strategies are invaluable for working with “non-responders,” looping, and dissociative clients. Barry demonstrates multiple somatic interweaves that facilitate safe desensitization in dissociative clients as well as boosting appropriate ego boundaries to enhance differentiation of self and improved assertiveness.

In this two-hour workshop (including video taped demonstration), participants will learn a strategy for efficiently isolating and titrating traumatic material, be able to incorporate a streamlined set of techniques to rapidly desensitize dissociative and “stuck” clients, and take reprocessing to a deeper level. Participants will learn timesaving and effective methods for safely processing highly charged material while keeping their clients grounded and stable.

These techniques are not part of the standard, eight-phase protocol and therefore cannot be offered for EMDRIA credits.

Clients who suffer from complex PTSD, attachment disorders, dissociation, and ego state conflict present special challenges to the EMDR clinician. Ego state conflicts can confound the desensitization phase by switching of states or premature inner resourcing which defeats thorough processing of the traumatic material, or blocking access to traumatic networks entirely. Looping is common in many clients, some of whom do not have complex “T” trauma histories.

Participants will learn to use the Optimal Zone of Arousal model both to gauge client readiness for desensitization and reprocessing, and to identify specific innovative techniques to maximize therapeutic response. Innovations include one-eye processing and the Eye-Zone Differential technique to isolate ego states, titrate traumatic experience, and resource the client for trauma focused work.

This workshop describes the "Optimal Zone of Arousal," a model by which clinicians can typologize processing problems and quickly identify remedies. In addition, participants will learn innovative methods in (phase 3) Assessment and variations in (phase 4) eye movements combined with one-eye processing to isolate the neural network being targeted, allow for titration of the intensity of the experience, and facilitate pendulation for efficient processing. Participants will learn the theory and methods behind neural net isolation and learn how and when to employ these advanced techniques. Lecture will be followed by either a.) a practicum, or b.) a live demonstration at the discretion of the audience.

*Litt, B. (2009, August). Node isolation theory: The eye-zone differential technique. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the EMDR International Association, Atlanta, GA.

A Therapist's Guide to Trauma, Dissociation, and Attachment


Enormous advances have been made in recent decades in the understanding of trauma and its sequelae. Moreover, the importance of secure attachment, and the risks associated with insecure attachment further our understanding of resilience or vulnerability to traumatic stress. This workshop will acquaint clinicians with state-of-the-art concepts of trauma, dissociation, and attachment, their presentation in the therapy room, and therapies that have shown the most promise in treating these issues.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to describe two general types of psychological trauma.
  2. Participants will be able to name three “animal defenses.”
  3. Participants will able to describe three types of structural dissociation.
  4. Participants will be able to name the three main types of attachment style in childhood.
  5. Participants will be able to name the three main types of attachment style in adults.
  6. Participants will be able to describe the phenomenon of memory reconsolidation and its significance in psychotherapy.
  7. Participants will be able to name three therapeutic approaches that involve memory reconsolidation.
This is a 6 credit-hour workshop


What People are Saying about the Workshops...


"Barry Litt is a gifted teacher, clinician and creative force. His theoretician's mind combines a deep knowledge of the subject matter with a razor sharp wit and an instinctive understanding of how people learn best. Clinicians leave his workshops exhilarated, empowered and hungry for more."
--Victoria Britt, LCSW, LMFT

"I have been a Marital and Family Therapist for 35 years and an EMDR therapist for 12. Barry Litt's elegant and enjoyable integration of these complex theories and methods is without question worth the price of admission. I consider a workshop very successful if I can immediately apply the material on Monday morning, have my understanding of conceptual material stimulated and have a good time as well. Barry's workshop was for me, very successful. I highly and without question recommend it for any EMDR therapist working with or thinking of working with Couples."
--Bennet Wolper, LMSW. EMDRIA Approved Consultant.

"It is rare to find the combination of intellect, humor and accessibility that I experienced in Barry Litt's workshop on Couples, Ego States and EMDR. He demonstrated a keen understanding of all three areas and an ability to present that made difficult material extremely comprehensible and if I dare say so, fun."
--Zona Scheiner, PhD

"This workshop, presented in a lively, often humorous way, brings ego state theory to life for those who work with couples. Barry's is one of a handful of essential voices out there for describing the power and importance of EMDR and ego state therapy."
--Carol Forgash, LCSW

"Barry Litt is a thoughtful, innovative, and funny (enthusiastic, spirited, energetic) teacher and clinician who brings the dynamics and challenges of couples therapy to life for his workshop participants. He is solidly grounded in theory, yet very precise and practical in helping practitioners navigate the rocky waters of couples therapy. He skillfully integrates the concepts of ego state therapy with a sophisticated understanding of the EMDR Adaptive Information Processing model."
--Deborah Korn, PhD.



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